TSE President receives journalists on TV show’s premiere

TSE President receives journalists on TV show’s premiere

On 4 February, Justice Marco Aurelio received four journalists invited to participate in the first episode of the show "Elections 2014 - a conversation with the President of the Superior Electoral Court." Cristina Serra, from TV Globo; Josias de Souza, UOL Portal columnist; Roseann Kennedy, from CBN Radio; and Dad Squarisi, from Correio Braziliense; asked questions to Justice Marco Aurelio on "the Resolutions of the 2014 Elections and the links between society, politics and voting”. The half-hour informal conversation took place in the TSE plenary and will air on February 5 on the Justice TV channel.
During the program, issues of interest to voters were addressed in a more dynamic fashion. In addition to the elections, Justice Marco Aurelio addressed the protests that took place in several cities in Brazil last year, public financing of campaigns and electronic voting machines, among various topics. According to the President of the TSE, the purpose of the conversation is "above all, to make voters aware of the core elements of a democratic election."
Questions
The debate was opened by journalist Cristina Serra, who questioned Justice Marco Aurelio on the future of the Resolution dealing with electoral crimes (namely Resolution 23,396). The text was approved late last year by the majority of TSE members, and restricted the opening of electoral investigations to Electoral Judges. In other words, the General Attorney's Office and the Federal Police, as per the Resolution, may only open investigations after obtaining a court authorization.
Justice Marco Aurelio was outvoted at the time of approval of this resolution and, in response to Cristina Serra, reaffirmed his belief that such decision will evolve. According to him, this issue will be resolved at the administrative level by the TSE, as discussions are now more mature. “I am convinced that there will be an evolution on that, since Federal Constitution set forth this authority upon the General Attorney's Office."
Journalist Dad Squarisi, in turn, began by praising the TSE, which, she says, "is a reason for pride for all of us because it is an example to the whole world, particularly regarding the electronic voting machines and the fast counting of election results." Before that, she questioned whether it was not possible to use electronic media and the educational campaigns carried out by the TSE to "improve information given to voters" or to "teach them how to seek for information about candidates."
In response, Justice Marco Aurelio mentioned the protests seen in several Brazilian cities in the past year, and said it was important to make voters aware that they are not victims, but rather makers of the choice of their representatives. “Therefore, ideal protests take place at the ballot, and next one is schedule for October 5th," he said, emphasizing that true protesting lies not in destroying public and private buildings, but rather in choosing people's representatives.
At the end of the program, participants praised the idea of the show and stated that these meetings will serve to enlighten voters about their choices on election day. Check the testimonials from the journalists below:
Dad Squarisi - Voter awareness is very important, and the more information voters have, the more aware they become and the better they will choose their representatives. Therefore, programs like this are essential to better inform public opinion. Like Justice Marco Aurelio said, the voter has a leading role in the process, and has to be aware of that fact and know how to exercise that role. That's what this show is all about.
Roseann Kennedy - The show is a way to bring more clarification to the population. The more we clarify information to voters, the better our chances of not running into some situations we've seen, so many politicians involved in misconduct. The greatest protest is held on the ballot.
Josias de Souza - I found it a very interesting initiative. I was pleased to participate, because when people look at these large buildings of Brasilia, our Superior Courts, they are very ‘airtight’ buildings. So the more we ‘open them,' and the more we ask voters to vote consciously, the better. The show offers voters information, and the election process is a process we learn on through repetition. Brazil is making strides, and obviously a change like this does not happen overnight, but what we have here is a grain of sand that helps in providing voters with information that enables them to better exercise their vote.
Cristina Serra - The more transparency the better. People want transparency, and this initiative was good because it goes on that direction, clarifying things, telling people what the rules are, how things will work. We have a busy year ahead of us with election, World Cup and promises for more protests. We see very strong disquiet in a society who wants transformation and these elections will be a moment of opportunity for transformation, so nothing more important than clarifying the rules of election. I think Justice Marco Aurelio very comfortably answered everything we asked and went even further. I think it was enlightening, and I hope viewers enjoy the conversation.